Klac Tik – The Servants

Klac Tik.  As names go it’s original and unique; some might go as far as weird.  These are just three of the words that describe the ten track experience that is The Servants.  Klac Tik combine sounds effortlessly and creatively to create sound-scapes that will transport your mind and give it something to ponder in the process.  Sit back, ideally with headphones the size of a small house strapped to your head, and get ready to visit more places than an indecisive millionaire.

St Barnaby’s Lurch introduces you to Klac Tik’s sound.  Within the first minute you’re treated to a dark but persistent acoustic guitar and vocal harmonies that verge on choral.  As St Barnaby’s Lurch reaches it’s chorus the tone of the track becomes happy and uplifting.  A warm bass line and trumpets cement this in your head and help make your first trip a pleasant one.  Underneath a multitude of sounds however the lyrics explore a damaged emotional state as lines such as ‘They gave you nothing/If not everything’ echo down your ears, before getting enveloped by the chorus.  Acting like Robin to the instrument’s Batman these catch you by surprize.  St Barnaby’s Lurch is an ideal introduction to Klac Tik’s sound.

Klac Tik, Soren Bonke, Jonathan Beyer, Matthew Mitchinson, Andy Joseph

Much like a person with many moods, The Servants feels like one individual experiencing a spectrum of emotions in a highly human and relatable way.  Reborn is simple yet harmonious tale of finding happiness in the world around you.  A kind and organic drum beat leads you along assisted by another wide assortment of instruments.  The sense of peace delivered by Reborn is echoed in Nympherous, an oriental lullaby.  Supported by lilting sounds Nympherous is a story of finding comfort in others.  It’s not all peace and comfort however.  Fire Souls shows a timid but quietly positive side to Klac Tik as they celebrate the effect life events have on clearing indecision.  Kierkegaard highlights this indecision with a muddled forced feel and a sense of inaction as more sounds than you can keep track of float around your head.  Kierkegaard has the feel of a track that will only improve with listens.

Not all the places Klac Tik take you to are as pleasant as the above.   As the emotional tour flies into illegal airspace tracks such as Quenched Man explores risk taking and what happens when the risk wasn’t worth talking.  Set to a somber soundtrack Quenched Man highlights the power of Klac Tik’s music.  Curved Mirror doesn’t improve the mood as it shows the power of negative reflection, somehow in a way that makes you want to keep listening.  Cool Luke Hand manages to capture an eerie mood, be it one with inspired vocal production, as it speaks of the way people can lock themselves away.

The Servants, Klac Tik

After Lohrengrin highlights again the musical ability of Klac Tik, Landing Party finishes the trip.  Bi-polar in nature, the initially trumpet led intro becomes something murky and uncertain.  Finding it’s strength again Landing Party ends in a new and balanced place.  Start to finish The Servants by Klac Tik is an emotional and musical journey.  Written very much as a complete  entity this is a rare and enjoyable experience.

Klac Tik on Facebook

David Horn

Track Listing:

  1. St Barnaby’s Lurch
  2. Kierkegaard
  3. Reborn
  4. Fire Souls
  5. Quenched Man
  6. Curved Mirror
  7. Nympheous
  8. Cool Luke Hand
  9. Lohengrin
  10. Landing Party

Related Posts:

Release Review: Syd Arthur – Dorothy

Release Review: Savaging Spires – Savaging Spires

News: Klac Tik New Single Stream

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